Vatican to SSPX: We’re Done Now

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Vatican to SSPX: We’re Done Now


In the end, this was basically bound to happen and was guessed years ago, but since it’s happened, it’s made the news. The Vatican has told the SSPX, the Latin-Mass group that tries to operate as an anti-ecumenical and traditionalist body, that because of their refusal to accept Vatican II, the dialogue between the two has effectively ended.

The end of the dialogue probably most benefits the SSPX, because the recent entrance into discussions with the Vatican has led to questions about its credibility and viability as a traditionalist group. On the other hand, liberals in the Roman Catholic Church have decried dialogue with the SSPX as a return to the dark ages, particularly when Richard Williamson, one of their Bishops, questioned the severity of the Nazi program against the Jews in World War II, after which he and the other SSPX leaders began to distance themselves from each other.

The SSPX was formed in 1970 to protest the promulgation of the New Mass and decisions of the Second Vatican Council by Archbishop Marcel Lefebvre, who was excommunicated by the Vatican for disobedience in 1988. The excommunications against Lefebvre’s successors were lifted last year by Rome, with the exception of Williamson for his positions on World War II and the Jews.

Via Reuters:

Archbishop Gerhard Mueller, who took up his post as head of the powerful Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith (CDF) in July, said in an interview to be broadcast on Saturday that the Church could not negotiate away the fundamentals of its faith.

His comments to North German Radio (NDR) were the first from the Vatican on deadlocked talks meant to reintegrate the Society of Saint Pius X (SSPX) into the Church after a 21-year schism over its implacable opposition to 1960s reforms.

In recent weeks, SSPX leaders have indicated a two-year series of talks with the Vatican had hit an impasse because Rome’s insistence that they accept reforms of the 1962-1965 Second Vatican Council was a deal breaker for them.

“We cannot give away the Catholic faith in negotiations,” Mueller said according to a pre-broadcast report by NDR.

“There will be no compromises here,” he said. “I think there now will be no new discussions.”